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Year by Year...


If you do not know our family you will probably find this uninteresting and wonder why it is on the Internet. It is here primarily for our friends and members of our family who are interested. You are, however, welcome to read it, if you want, and we hope you find it interesting. If you do not, please do not (like one idiot) send us a note saying that you found this boring. No one forced you to read it and we really feel no obligation whatsoever to entertain you.
  1. 1991
  2. 1992
  3. 1993
  4. 1994
  5. 1995
  6. 1996
  7. 1997
  8. 1998
  9. 1999
  10. 2000
  11. 2001
  12. 2002

The Year 1991 for the Bristows

of Albany, Kentucky 42602

by Duane Bristow

The year 1991 started out with the threat of the Gulf war and, sure enough, the war started Jan. 16, and our son, David's, army reserve unit was called to duty that same day. Although David was able to serve his two months at Fort Knox, the war meant that he missed both the winter and spring terms at Centre College and means that he will not be able to graduate with his class in June 1992 but will have to attend college for an extra year.

After the war David returned to Danville, Kentucky where he rented an apartment and looked for a job eventually working in a forklift factory, as a garbage man and doing yard work for various people around Danville. He also meant a lovely girl, Latisha Galbreath, and her five year old son, Cruz. When college ended in June, David began working in the office of the Dean of Students, Ray Hammond, and worked there full time the rest of the summer and part time when he returned to classes this fall. David and Tisha went together all summer and fall and in December they announced their engagement.

In June my sister, Karen's, husband, Gary, took a job with the unit of his company, Delco Electronics, located in Mission, Texas and they moved there. Karen got a job as a counselor at a school system near there this fall and they have become Texans. They are living on the Mexican border and Gary's factory is located just over the river in Mexico. He is learning Spanish but Karen hasn't yet.

In May Eva's brother, David, who lives in Peoria, Illinois became sick and was hospitalized. He was soon diagnosed with cancer. Aunt Mae visited us the end of May and we took her home the first of June. From her house we drove over to Peoria and Eva spent some time with David in the hospital. David died June 9. We returned to Illinois for the funeral and visited there with most of Eva's family.

My mother spent the year in the nursing home with several periods of hospitalization in Cookeville. She has not been in pain this year but she has had a number of periods of infection of the bedsores on her hips and legs. It finally got so bad in September that she had to have both her legs amputated just above the knees. Her recovery from that surgery has been pretty good, however. She does have increasing problems with bed sores but, so far, no pain and she is in relatively good spirits.

Our younger son, Chris, is in the eighth grade this fall. He got to take a one day plane trip to Washington, D. C. in May with his seventh grade class. We all went to a Reds game in Cincinnati in June also. He enjoyed that.

Eva and I have been doing our usual computer work, housework, and farming this year. The cattle and tobacco produced well in spite of a month long drought this summer and the farm made a slight profit.

We all hope that 1992 is a good year for all our friends and relatives.


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The Year 1992 for the Bristows

of Albany, Kentucky 42602

by Duane Bristow

The year 1992 for the Bristow's was relatively uneventful until May 28. On that day our oldest son, David, married Latisha Galbreath, a native of Danville, Kentucky. They were married in Danville and they and 'Tisha's 6 year old son, Cruz, are making their home there. Tisha does office work at Cardinal Hill Hospital in Lexington and David works for UPS from 3:30 to 8:30 in the mornings. He then goes to school for the rest of the day. David worked for Centre college this summer and started work at UPS this fall. This fall he is attending the University of Kentucky for one semester but will return to Centre after the first of the year. In October David, Tisha, Cruz, and Tisha's mother, Pat, spent a few days with us during the Foothills Festival held in Albany. Fortunately, Aunt Mae was able to come from Indiana to visit us at the same time and we all had an enjoyable time together.

On the day of David and Tisha's wedding my mother, Nora, had to be hospitalized in Cookeville, Tennessee due to bowel obstructions and water retention. She was in the hospital for a couple of weeks and very seriously ill on at least three different occasions. After returning to the nursing home in Algood she remained on antibiotics by IV for a couple of months. Later she had increasing problems with infection from the bedsores she has had for five years. In November she spent three weeks in Baptist Hospital in Nashville and had surgery in which her hipbone and the bedsores were removed. Plastic surgery was then performed to cover her hip with skin flaps. She recovered quickly and is now back in the nursing home doing fine.

Aunt Ollie Adler died in Richmond, Indiana in mid-February. We went to the funeral and spent a couple of nights with Aunt Mae. We took a couple other trips this summer. We spent a few days in Indiana visiting Aunt Mae in July and we spent a few days in Asheville, North Carolina and the Smokey Mountains at the end of July. While in Indiana we went to a Cincinnati Reds baseball game. In the Smokies we hiked to Clingman's Dome, the highest point in the Smokies.

My sister Karen returned to Kentucky to visit three times this summer and will also be back for Christmas next week. She and Gary are still living and working in Texas.

Eva's brother, Baylos, who has been ill with emphysema for almost three years now died October 8. Baylos was the third brother she has lost. Her brother, Norman, and two sisters, Ruth and Mary, remain.

Our younger son, Chris, turned 15 this month. He is in his first year of High School this year and is doing well. I began teaching him to drive this summer.

Eva and I have been doing our usual computer work, housework, and farming this year. The cattle and tobacco produced well. We had a big Thanksgiving dinner this year as usual. We only had twelve people, a few less than last year.

We all hope that 1993 is a good year for all our friends and relatives.


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The Year 1993 for the Bristows

of Albany, Kentucky 42602

by Duane Bristow

The year 1993 for the Bristows was relatively uneventful until March when we were hit with the great blizzard of '93. Karen was returning to Kentucky from Texas at the time and was stranded for two days at Nashville and Cookeville because all roads were impassable. Winds gusted up to 40 or 50 miles per hour and the snow drifts were two or three feet deep in Albany, much deeper in the mountains. We got a total of about 10 inches of snow. We lost one new born calf in a snow bank but otherwise weathered the storm fine.

Our oldest Son, David, his wife, Tisha, and her son, Cruz continued living in Danville, Kentucky this year. David graduated from Centre College the end of May and he, Tisha, and Cruz took our younger son, Chris, to Florida with them for a week's vacation. They all had a great time. David has worked two jobs at once this year, loading trucks for UPS, and delivering pizzas for Papa John's pizza. David got out of the Army Reserves this summer after serving six years. Tisha continues working for Cardinal Hill Hospital in Lexington. They are expecting a child in February of '94. It will be our first grandchild.

Eva's niece, Lisa Harlan, married in April. Eva's brother, Norman, came from Illinois for the wedding and they had a family get together at our house afterward. Eva's Aunt, Nettie Ewing, died in late May. She was over 90 and was buried in Peolia Cemetery.

My cousin, Deloris Rutherford, from Lexington, Kentucky visited us in the summer and again in the fall and we stayed overnight at her house in late July.

We visited Aunt Mae Beck in Straughn, Indiana in early August and we all went to a Reds baseball game in Cincinnati. David, Tisha, and Cruz met us there and watched the game with us. Then we all went out for supper together at the Florence Mall. Aunt Mae visited us in October for the Foothills Festival in Albany.

My mother, Nora, had a pretty good year. She was hospitalized in March with chest congestion and in November she had relatively minor surgery for bed sores at Baptist Hospital in Nashville. Otherwise she had a good year. We had a dinner for her at the nursing home in Algood, Tennessee the day after Christmas. Fourteen or fifteen people attended.

My sister Karen returned to Kentucky to visit three times this year. She and her husband, Gary, are still living and working in Texas.

Our younger son, Chris, turned 16 in December. He is in his sophomore year of High School this year and is doing well. He got his driver's permit soon after his 16th birthday. Chris helped me cruise a timber tract in the cold weather last January and he did most of the hard work to build us over a hundred feet of brick walk behind the house in the late summer.

Eva and I have been doing our usual computer work, housework, and farming this year. We visited David and Tisha and went to a Lynn Redgrave show at Centre College in February. We enjoyed that. In the heat this summer Eva finally got me to buy the first air conditioner we have ever owned for the downstairs of the house. They can be kinda handy.

On the farm the cattle and tobacco produced well. We harvested over 100,000 board feet of sawtimber this summer. This fall we built about half a mile of new fence alongside the Old Monticello Road. The first of September we finally got rid of my Uncle, Larry Bristow, by buying out his part of the farm. I did quite a bit of forestry work this summer on a 5,000 acre tract of timber on Pine Mountain near Jellico, Tennessee. It was hard, hot and interesting work but the timber was of low quality and I didn't make enough money to pay for my time.

We had a big Thanksgiving dinner this year as usual and a good Christmas with all the family.

We all hope that 1994 is a good year for all our friends and relatives.


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The Year 1994 for the Bristows

of Albany, Kentucky 42602

by Duane Bristow

The year 1994 started out with a very cold and snowy January and February in Kentucky. It was 18 below zero on January 19th. Chris and I spent several days walking to the barn to feed in the snow and the cold.

On February 24, our first grandchild, Eva Victoria Bristow, was born to our oldest son, David, and his wife, Tisha, in Lexington. Eva, Chris, and I were at the hospital for the birth along with Tisha's family. Victoria has been a pleasure this year. We have seen her fairly often, although Eva says not enough. Eva also says she is growing up too fast.

David, Tisha, Cruz, and Victoria continued living in Danville this year moving from the apartment to a rental house in the outskirts of town at the end of April. David left his pizza delivery job to take a job as placement director at a Danville business college in January. By October though he quit there and went back to pizza delivery because he found that he made more money that way. Tisha has been baby sitting in her home most of the year. David and his family made a trip to Illinois this summer and visited with Eva's family in Peoria for a few days.

Our youngest son, Chris, is a Junior in High School now. He got his driver's license last fall.

On the farm the cattle and tobacco produced well. There was an abundance of rain this year spaced almost perfectly for crop growth. We bought a bigger used tractor and a hay roller and rake so we could catch up with the rest of the country and begin rolling hay rather than square baling it. That cut down on labor but we had to learn a lot of new techniques.

Our family was plagued with deaths this year, especially in September. First my Aunt Betty MacDonald died on May 13. Then in September my mother, Nora Bristow, died on the 18th. A neighbor, Harold Parrigin, died on the 19th. My uncle, Herschel Lafever, died on the 22nd and my great aunt Ruby Craft Bristow died on the 23rd. We did nothing but attend funerals for over a week. Mama had a good year in the nursing home until her death. She was only sick for a few days in the spring and hospitalized then. We saw her the day before she died and she felt well until the night before, then she was gone suddenly. She enjoyed getting to see her new great grandchild, Victoria, and kept her picture on the dresser in her room. We had dinner with her New Year's and on Mother's day. She enjoyed that. She is buried at Gap Creek Cemetary in Wayne County Kentucky beside my father, Jesse Bristow.

My sister, Karen, visited us in Kentucky from her home in Texas in March, June, September, and at Thanksgiving and Christmas this year.

Aunt Mae Beck in Indiana had a very rough year. She was in an automobile wreck last winter and had several ribs broken. After that in the spring she got an abdominal infection and was hospitalized and almost died. Then in the summer she got a bad case of shingles which made her miserable for several months. We visited with her in March and August. In August we took her to a Cincinnati Reds baseball game with David and his family. She is doing better this winter.

We had a very enjoyable year at home this year with very nice weather and many enjoyable visitors including Eva's sisters and their families, friends of David's and Cruz's who spent time with us, friend's of Karen's and several others. Chris and I built a goldfish pond and a patio beside the walk in the yard this summer and we all spent many enjoyable days and nights sitting, relaxing, playing, eating and conversing around it. David and his family and Eva, Chris and I spent a day in Eastern Kentucky the first of August visiting the places we lived when David was born. We went to Corbin, Rockholds, Pineville, and Middlesboro. It was a nostalgic visit for Eva and I and maybe for David.

This fall I took time off from my computer business work to write a computer genealogy program called Social, Family, and Historical Relationships. We intend to use it to organize a lot of family records.

We had a big Thanksgiving dinner this year as usual and a good Christmas with all the family. At Thanksgiving Eva cooked for twenty family members. We all enjoyed Victoria and Cruz at Christmas and they enjoyed Christmas. Eva overdid herself at decorating the house but she and I loved it when it was done.

We all hope that 1995 is a good year for all our friends and relatives.


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The Year 1995 for the Bristows

of Albany, Kentucky 42602

by Duane Bristow

The year 1995 started out with the news that Clinton County had been designated as a part of one of only three Rural Empowerment Zones in the nation and would be eligible to receive several million dollars in federal money to be used locally to help develop the area and fight poverty. On January 13, Chris took off from school and he and I drove to Monticello to meet with about 500 other local people with Vice President Al Gore. He had come to the area to announce the Rural Empowerment Zone and talk about its potential. We enjoyed the chance to be in the crowd, see the Vice President and learn a little something about democracy in action. Later on through the winter and spring I made a number of contacts of people all over the nation to try to encourage investment in land in the area with varying degrees of success.

On January 24, my uncle Beecher Lafever died at his home near Cookeville, Tennessee. David and his family came home from Danville and we all went to Cookeville to the funeral together.

In the middle of March Eva and I went to Straughn, Indiana to visit Aunt Mae Beck and we took her over to Dayton, Ohio to visit her sister Zella Gorsuch. At the end of April Aunt Mae Beck came to visit us in Kentucky and stayed a couple of days. We visited her again in August. Aunt Mae was in better health this year than last although she did have to have cataracts removed from both eyes this fall and winter. Her sister, Aunt Zella, though is in increasingly fading health and had to go into a nursing home this fall.

My sister, Karen Bristow, and her husband, Gary Steele, divorced in June and she returned to Kentucky from Texas. She now lives in her house on the farm near ours. Karen took 3 college courses this summer working on her Rank I educational degree and now has teaching certificates in Texas, Tennessee, and Kentucky. She got a job this fall working with the State Department of Social Services and works out of their Jamestown office.

On June 29, our second grandchild, Maria Caroline Bristow, was born to our oldest son, David, and his wife, Tisha, in Lexington. Eva, Chris, and I were at the hospital for the birth along with Tisha's family. Eva stayed at David's house while Tisha was in the hospital and took care of Victoria and Cruz. It gave Eva and Victoria a chance to get acquainted and they have been great pals ever since. Caroline is chubbier than her older sister, Victoria, and is a quite baby and a good eater.

We returned to Danville on July 8 for David's birthday and while Eva and Tisha took care of the little girls, I took David, Chris, and Cruz to a Star Trek Convention in Lexington. It featured an address by Marina Sirtis and Chris got several of her autographed pictures in an autograph session afterwards.

Our son, Chris, is a senior in high school this year and in the fall he was accepted as a student in next year's class at the University of Kentucky. Chris bought his first car, a 1984 Oldsmobile, from my sister, Karen, in August. Chris is on the high school's academic team. In early August Eva, Chris and I went to Indiana to visit Aunt Mae and we went to a Red's baseball game in Cincinnati. David and Tisha and their kids met us there and we all had a good time at the afternoon ball game and had supper in Florence, Kentucky together afterwards.

I continued my computer business as usual this year setting up business systems, writing programs, and consulting. I did more timber consulting than usual this year, doing timber appraisals, cruises and damage appraisals in Bell, Lee, Cumberland, and Monroe counties in Kentucky as well as three jobs in Clinton county. In July I set up a web site on the internet. The site address is http://www.kyphilom.com/duane/welcome.html.

The farm produced well this year in spite of a month long drought in mid summer which caused a hay shortage of about 1500 bales. That means we will have to buy hay this winter. That and the present low cattle prices means a cash flow problem now. Cattle are selling for less than half what they were a couple of years ago. We were fortunate to lease the farm for drilling of one hole for oil in mid summer. Unfortunately, the hole was drilled in dry at 1800 feet around the first of August. We had hopes due to the gas and small oil amounts hit in three other holes in previous years that this one might find the oil pool which we are pretty sure is somewhere under the farm.

Eva had trouble with her knee all year and was unable to put out a garden for the first time since we have been married. However, a number of trips to a chiropractor were helpful and she is getting around better now. After Christmas the doctors put her on medicine for high blood pressure. Her yellow cat Sandy also disappeared this summer. In spite of all this though she had a good year with visits to family and visits by her sisters and her grand daughters and Cruz.

At the Foothills Festival in Albany on October 21, Eva's sister Ruth and her family came to visit as did David and his family and they also brought Tisha's grandmother, Hazel. We all had a good time at the festival and at the house afterwards. We had a big Thanksgiving dinner as usual but with fewer people this year. Only David and his family and Eva's sister, Mary and her husband were able to come. On Christmas night we had a quite candlelight Christmas Supper with just David's family and Karen. We all enjoyed it. Eva was late finishing the Christmas decorations so she didn't take them down until well after the first of the New Year.

We all hope that 1996 is a good year for all our friends and relatives.


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The Year 1996 for the Bristows

of Albany, Kentucky 42602

by Duane Bristow

We had a year marked by medical problems for Eva, graduation from High School and beginning college for Chris, much time spent with family and grandchildren, farm economic problems, and visits from family. All in all, a good enjoyable year.

Our son, Chris, finished high school with good grades in May. We did not have enough help on the farm this summer so he was a life saver. Chris spent the summer mowing and taking up hay, bushhogging pasture fields, mowing lawns, cleaning out fence rows and he even helped set tobacco. In August Chris got a newer used car, a white 1988 Oldmobile Cutlass Supreme. In late August he began his freshman year at the University of Kentucky at Lexington. Chris enjoys attending college and he got all A's and B's his first semester. Chris has decided to major in psychology.

Eva continued to have problems with her knee. That and back pains that got increasingly worse meant that she spent a lot of time going to doctors and physical therapists this year. She had knee surgery in September and had a number of tests and tried a lot of medicines, physical therapies and diagnostic tests. She now is on a program of daily exercises which are very time consuming.

Our farm helper, Charlie Myers, has been ill much of the year and he was hospitalized for several days in mid year, so that we were short handed on farm work. The current opinion is that he will need a heart pace maker. Due to bad weather last winter we had to buy a lot of hay. Due to lack of help I knew that we couldn't take up enough hay this year. So we sold about 2/3 of the cattle herd this year and, for the first time in several years, began growing corn again. We grew 40 acres of corn. Cattle prices were low and we took large losses on our cattle operation. However, both the corn and tobacco produced well and sold well this fall.

I did a lot of computer consulting work as usual this year and gained several new customers. I also completed several timber cruising jobs including a 7,000 acre job in eastern Kentucky. That job took me several days throughout the year and Chris helped me cruise timber on a number of days. I also got involved in a few land sales projects via the Internet.

Our son, David, continued working at UPS and, for a few months in mid summer, he and Tisha tried working at a local restaurant in Danville. Later though they decided to go back to more child care and pizza deliveries at Papa John's. We visited them several times in Danville this year and they and their family spent a number of weekends with us. Twice they brought Victoria and Caroline to spend the weekend with Grandma and Grandpa so they could have the weekend off. We enjoyed that. Tisha's son, Cruz, is in the sixth grade in the Boyle County Schools this year and is playing basketball.

We grew a lot of tomatoes in the tobacco field this summer and really enjoyed the taste of vine ripened tomatoes. We had all we could eat and all Eva wanted to can. Much better than store bought and a number of different varieties.

My great aunt, Zella Gorsuch, died in Dayton, Ohio in February. Eva and I went to the funeral and took her sister, my other great aunt, Mae Beck, with us. Aunt Mae from Indiana visited us in April and again in October. My mother's sister, Lorene, and her husband came from Tennessee and visited with us in October and Eva's brother, Norman Harlan, his wife, Doris, and Eva's sister-in-law, Jay, from Illinois visited us in September. Eva's sisters, Mary and Ruth, also came to see us several times this year.

In early June Eva, Chris and I went to Indiana to visit Aunt Mae and we went to a Red's baseball game in Cincinnati. David and Tisha and their kids met us there and we all had a good time at the afternoon ball game and had supper in Florence, Kentucky together afterwards. Eva, Chris and I also enjoyed watching the summer Olympics in Atlanta on TV in July.

My sister, Karen, continued to work as a social worker for the State of Kentucky this year and this fall and winter she is having an extension added on to her house to expand the size of the living room. She wants the room but doesn't seem to like the mess of remodeling.

The Internet site we put on the World Wide Web became very popular this year. By the end of the year we were getting between 200 and 300 visitors to the site every day. We added a number of new features and much additional information to it this year. Chris did a lot of the typing.

We all hope that 1997 is a good year for all our friends and relatives.


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The Year 1997 for the Bristows

of Albany, Kentucky 42602

by Duane Bristow

The year 1997 was a year of unusual weather making it difficult to raise farm crops, many family visits, work, house repairs, college for Chris, and continued knee and back problems as well as several bouts with high blood pressure for Eva. Overall though, a good year.

Other than her health problems, Eva and I had a good year. We kept our grandkids on weekends several times and they and their parents came to visit us a number of times. For our anniversary in April, David and Tisha treated us to a night at a really nice Bed and Breakfast in Harrodsburg, Kentucky and a performance at the Norton Center for the Arts at Centre College. We enjoyed that. Since David and Tisha could not come for Christmas until the Saturday after Christmas, we all celebrated Christmas on that day. Eva, Chris and I took a vacation in Gatlinburg, Tennessee for three days before and during Christmas day. The Smokies were beautiful and we all really enjoyed the Christmas decorations there. Unfortunately, Eva's blood pressure went very high during the last two days of that trip and over the Christmas weekend so she wasn't able to get out in Gatlingburg or to do as much during Christmas as she had hoped. She did, however, have the house decorated beautifully before Christmas and we all had a nice Christmas.

We had lots of good tomatoes this summer and the grapevine growing across the railing of our front balcony produced a bumper crop. We all, but especially Tisha and her daughters, liked to sit there and eat grapes picked fresh off the vine.

In mid August Eva's aunt, Edna Harlan, died near Chicago where she was living with her sister, Elsie. She was returned to Albany for her funeral and burial and Eva and a number of cousins she hadn't seen for years spent an afternoon after the funeral going over their grandparent's old homeplace which had been abandoned for a number of years. Elsie is now the only member of that family still alive and the old Harlan homeplace will be sold in the spring. I put a number of old pictures I found in that house on the Internet.

Since it had been 18 years (where did they go?) since our house was built we had to have it reroofed and repaired last spring. Also builders began building a garage on Karen's house next door this winter. So quite a bit of building, repairing and remodeling went on here this year. All the building is being done by Shelton Brothers who have been doing farm and house building for us for about a quarter of a century now.

My sister, Karen, continued to work as a social worker for the State of Kentucky this year.

Our son, Chris, had an interesting year. In March during his spring break from college at UK he first met us in Straughn, Indiana where we were visiting with my Aunt Mae. He left there and took a four day trip by himself to Niagara Falls, the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, and returned to Kentucky by way of Morgantown, West Virginia. It was a good trip and a good experience for him. Chris spent the summer working on the farm and keeping our lawn mowed. He bushhogged a lot of pasture fields, mowed and raked hay, cleaned out barns and did other farm work. In June we had an orphan calf and Chris bottle fed it every day until he got it weaned to solid food and fed it until he left to return to college at UK in mid August. Chris named it Hungry. Chris managed to wreck my car on a trip to the barn to feed the calf in June and our insurance bought us a replacement. This fall when he returned to school Chris rented a small apartment rather that returning to the dorm. He is better satisfied there.

David and Tisha's daughter, Caroline, had to be hospitalized for several days in March due to a bout with pneumonia and Eva and I helped them to take care of Cruz and Victoria, who was also sick, during that time. That was also the time when we went on to Indiana to visit with Aunt Mae and Chris. In August UPS, where David works, went on strike and David was off work for over a week. About Thanksgiving David and Tisha found a bigger house than the one they were renting and moved there. Now that they have the room, they are thinking of expanding their child care business. David still works two part time jobs, at UPS and Papa John's Pizza in Danville.

In June we visited Aunt Mae in Indiana again and we all went to a Red's baseball game in Cincinnati where we met David, Tisha, their kids, and Chris. After the ball game we all went out to supper together and Chris returned to Aunt Mae's house in Indiana with us. Aunt Mae also came to our house and spent a couple of days with us in mid December.

In mid October my Aunt, Lorene Allison, and her husband and my cousin, Jim Lafever, and his wife came to visit us during the Foothills Festival in Albany. We kept our granddaughters that weekend too. We went to the festival and got lots of good food and brought it home and all had a late lunch together and visited. A couple of weeks before Christmas we went to Aunt Lorene's house in Tennessee for a Christmas supper with a number of my cousins.

On the farm front, we rented our tobacco on the halves this year to a couple of women who grew about 30 acres of tobacco in all on a number of farms. Very hard workers. We also let another farmer grow 40 acres of corn on the farm on the shares. They both had to contend with a very wet spring which prevented getting the crops out on time. That was followed by a dry spell in the summer when the crops did not get enough moisture. In spite of that we had a good tobacco crop, but our corn yield was much reduced. We ran a smaller cattle herd than usual with only about 60 head on the farm this summer but they grew well and we had a good calf crop.

I only worked on a couple of timber cruising jobs this year. Chris helped me do one job in May when he got out of college for the summer. I also was a guest lecturer for a forest technician class at UK's community college in Breathitt County.

I did a lot of computer consulting work as usual this year and gained several new customers especially in the medical field in Burkesville, Kentucky, a small town about 20 miles from Albany.

The Internet site we have on the World Wide Web continued to be very popular this year. By the end of the year we were getting between 300 and 400 visitors to the site every day. We added a number of new features and much additional information to it this year. We have a lot of email correspondence from regular visitors to our web site.

We all hope that 1998 is a good year for all our friends and relatives.


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The Year 1998 for the Bristows

of Albany, Kentucky 42602

by Duane Bristow

The year 1998 was a pretty good year for the Bristows although it brought a number of problems due to weather, some health problems, and the deaths of some of our neighbors.

On our farm we grew corn and, for the first time ever, soybeans in addition to the usual tobacco, hay, and timber. Our cattle did well although cattle prices were low this fall and we had to sell for about 20% less than we had expected. Corn prices were about 30% lower this fall and soybean prices about 15 to 20% lower than the previous year. Tobacco prices were good but our crop fell about 12% short on pounds due to wet weather in the spring and dry weather in the summer. The wet weather washed out some of our tobacco plants and allowed black shank disease to become established in one of our tobacco fields and the dry weather later stunted growth on our late crop. We did purchase additional tobacco poundage last spring increasing the base pounds we are allowed to sell by about 25%. In spite of the low prices good yields in most of our crops and cattle allowed us to make a small profit on the farming operations. We had a small, but good, spring hay crop but no fall hay due to dry weather. As a result we will have to buy some hay to get the cattle herd through the winter.

Eva continued to have problems with high blood pressure, back pains, and knee problems. She went to a number of specialists to rule out various causes for hypertension and to get her blood pressure under control as well as undergoing a series of tests to rule out heart problems. She is now taking so much medicine to control her blood pressure that she is often weak and tired with some nausea. She was unable to grow a garden this year but did grow a lot of delicious tomatoes and some other vegetables in her flower beds in the yard.

Late in the year Duane was diagnosed as a type II diabetic and ordered to begin a program of diet control and regular exercise. Our sons and our daughter in law had a number of, mostly stress related, health problems during the year. Overall though we all did well physically.

The year was marked by cookouts on many weekends, our granddaughters, Victoria and Caroline, and sometimes their brother, Cruz, spending about one weekend per month with us and visits by our son, Chris. We also spent quite a bit of time on warm summer nights sitting out by our lily pond watching the frogs and the fish and the stars.

In the spring we had builders doing some repairs to our house. It is almost twenty years old now. They also finished building my sister, Karen's, garage on the side of her house in February. Afterward, in early February, we had a massive ice storm that cut off most of the electricity in the county for up to a week. Most of the cedar trees on our farm were damaged by the ice. Two large trees in our yard lost 30% to 50% of their limbs. It was a mess and took a long time to clean up. Eva and I were without electricity for three days. Many people in the county could not live in their homes without electricity but we were heating with a wood stove and we also used it for cooking. We used candles and kerosene lamps for light and I carried water from the spring so we were very comfortable.

In March we bought some cattle and Karen's dog, Butch, that she had had since he was a puppy was run over on the road and killed. She later got another puppy, half german shepherd and half collie.

There were several tornados in April and one did a lot of damage in Byrdstown, Tennessee about ten miles from our home. It destroyed all the homes and businesses on a ridge on the edge of the town. Cleanup and rebuilding took most of the rest of the year.

In May we went to the estate sale of Eva's Aunt, Edna Harlan. We saw several of Eva's cousins there. Then we went to a Booher reunion in Wayne County at the house of her first cousin, Ralph Booher. Our son,Chris, moved from his apartment to a house he is sharing with three other guys in Lexington and we went there to help him move and get some medical tests for Eva. Also in May my uncle, Clayborn Allison, died and we went to the funeral in Cookeville, Tennessee. We made a couple other trips to Cookeville during the year to visit with his widow, my aunt, Lorene, and our Lafever cousins. In October they came to visit us as did our son, David, and his family during the Foothills Festival and we went to the festival and got lots of good food to feed everyone.

Over the July 4th holiday Eva and I made a trip to Lexington to visit Chris, then on to Straughn, Indiana to spend a night with my Aunt Mae and then we went to Peoria, Illinois to visit Eva's brother, Norman, and his family and her brother, David's, family. Norman's son, Norman Dale, was in the hospital undergoing chemotherapy for cancer. He was very weakened when we saw him due to the treatments but he later recovered and returned to his job.

My sister, Karen, was promoted in her job with the state department of Social Services this year. She is now supervisor of a two county area. In August she went to her step-daughter, Julie Steele's, wedding in Indiana and spent some time with our Aunt Mae there. In October she took a week's vacation in Gatlinburg, Tennessee in the Great Smokey Mountains.

Our friends and neighbors who died this year included our next door neighbor, Gene Wade, in October and our friend, Murl Conner in November.

Our son, Chris, continued his studies in Psychology at the University of Kentucky at Lexington. He worked part time in food services at the University at the first of the year but in May he got a job working in a factory in Lexington. He worked there full time during the summer after taking a couple of summer courses at the University and then worked part time when he started back to UK for the fall semester. He says he likes the factory work better than he did working in food services. Also, in the summer, Chris and his new housemates took a trip to New Orleans for a few days. He enjoyed that.

Just before Christmas Eva, Chris, and I took a three day vacation in Gatlingburg, Tennessee. We returned just after an ice storm had hit Western Tennessee and our part of Kentucky. Christmas day Karen's horses got tangled in the electric line to the water pump in our spring and damaged the pump to the point that it had to be replaced. It was difficult to get a replacement pump over the holidays and as a result I had to carry water for a week but we managed just fine. Because of the water situation we went to David's house in Danville to celebrate Christmas instead of his family coming to our house.

David continued working for UPS and Papa John's this year although he is looking for a better, more permanent, full time job. Tisha expanded her child care business and worked very hard at it.

The computer business kept me very busy all year and in mid summer I began modifying my programs for year 2000 compatibility. Our Internet site became more popular all year. Some of our web efforts were reviewed on some internet magazines and our "War of the Minds" was featured in late December on an international syndicated radio program about the internet. Lots of our web visitors are interested in genealogy and forestry. By the end of December over 1,000 people per day were visiting our web site.

We all hope that 1999 is a good year for all our friends and relatives.


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The Year 1999 for the Bristows

of Albany, Kentucky 42602

by Duane Bristow

The year 1999 was similiar to 1998 with the exception of our computer programming business being dominated by program modifications for the year 2000 (Y2K) problem.

On the farm we grew corn and tobacco although our tobacco base was cut by about 25% due to national overproduction last season. We still had enough carry over pounds due to our short crop last year to be able to grow almost as much tobacco as before. We sowed about 30 acres of grass in the spring and did not grow any soybeans. We grew about 34 acres of corn. The soybeans were not profitable in 1998 and in 1999 due to drought and low prices we made almost no money on the corn and so decided to quit growing it also in 2000. We had a good tobacco crop though and due to payments from a national tobacco settlement fund from the tobacco companies made as much money as expected on that crop. We bought cows and 40 yearling calves in the spring and pastured them all summer selling all but 25 cows in the late fall. They did well although, due to dry weather in late summer, we were short on pastures and had to convert our fall hay crop to pasture use. Although we did not harvest any hay in the fall we did have a good spring hay crop. We spent a good part of the spring spraying brush in fencerows on the farm. We have about six miles of fences and many of the fencerows were out of control. Due to the dry weather in 1998 and our hay crop shortage we had to buy quite a bit of hay in the winter of 1998-99. That is one reason we did not try to carry a large cattle herd into the year 2000. My sister, Karen's oldest horse, a Tennessee Walker/Palomino cross, died in the winter and another of her horses died later in the year. She had had those two horses for over a quarter of a century. Also late in the year we made a deal with a logger to harvest cedar from the woodlands on the farm. Much of the cedar had been damaged in the ice storms in 1998 and we wanted to salvage that as well as harvest overmature trees and thin the remaining cedar stands.

Healthwise Eva continued to battle high blood pressure, back pains, knee problems and side effects from her medications. I continued to hike two miles 3 or 4 times a week to keep my diabetes under control. We did well otherwise. Eva grew a fine, although small, garden and I had no problems other than a stiff shoulder which was fixed by several visits to Eva's chiropractor.

Again this year we had a lot of cookouts on weekends and kept our grandchildren about one weekend per month. David and Tisha did not visit as often due to work schedules but our son, Chris, spent quite a bit of time with us on weekends and times off from work. We had cookouts on many weekends and had our family home for Thanksgiving and Christmas. We did meet with David and Tisha and their family a number of times for meals on Sundays at restaurants about halfway between our house and theirs and visited them at their house sometimes.

David and his family took a vacation in Indianapolis in April. David quit his job delivering pizza for Papa John's in March and began working at a local Rent-A-Center store. By the end of the year he was promoted to assistant manager. He continued his other job loading trucks for UPS for 4 or 5 hours in the early mornings. Tisha scaled back her child care business.

Chris continued working at his factory job and attending the University of Kentucky in the Spring. On a visit with us last winter he and I spent an enjoyable day climbing Sewell mountain. In March he and some of his housemates took a trip to Las Vegas and the Grand Canyon. When Chris returned from there he took a solo trip to Canada to Niagara Falls and Toronto. He really enjoys traveling. In May after spring semester Chris got an apartment in Lexington and Eva and I spent a day with him helping him move. He then took a trip to Indiana where he visited Aunt Mae and Aunt Dora and went to a Shania Twain concert. During the year Chris went to several concerts (mostly Shania Twain) in various cities and to several baseball games mostly in Cincinnati. In June Chris left his factory job and got a better job with a Lexington Rent-A-Center store, the same company David is working for in Danville. He decided not to return to college in the Fall but to work full time.

My sister, Karen, was promoted in her job with the state department of Social Services this year. She is now a technician at the regional level and works from an office in Somerset. This means more travel to and from work and more meetings and a larger area of responsiblity for her, but she seems to enjoy the new job more than the one she had. Karen took a vacation in Gatlingburg, Tennessee with a friend of hers at the end of September again this year and she went to visit our Aunt Mae in Straughn, Indiana over the New Year and saw the new millenium in there.

In March I began fixing Y2K bugs in my medical programs for Doctor's offices and Pharmacies. In May I began completely revising my accounting system which was originally written in the early 1980's. The result was a new system, PGAS. I also revised my utilities programs for natural gas, propane gas and water billing and my video rental and crude oil purchasing systems. The programming for all this dominated most of the year although I did find time to write a new program for Timber Cruise Analysis. and began work on a graphics and surveying program. In May I got a photo quality printer and with my digital camera began producing my own photos and doing a little photo customization work for a few local people.

In March we visited my Aunt Lorene at her new house in Tennessee. In April we went to a Chieftains concert in Danville and stayed at the Old Crow Inn. Also in April we had visitors from Istanbul we met on the Internet. In June we visited my Aunt Dora and Aunt Mae in Indiana. On July 4th we went to the Lafever family reunion at Burgess Falls park in Tennessee. Our dog, Ebony, a black lab, became blind and in poor health due to age and died in October. In November we had an indian we met on the internet visit us for a day. And in mid December we returned to Indiana to revisit Aunt Mae.

We all hope that 2000 is a good year for all our friends and relatives.


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The Year 2000 for the Bristows

of Albany, Kentucky 42602

by Duane Bristow

We started the new millenium this year with the internet and computer systems working. The world didn't end, as some had feared, just because we decided to number a year with a number that included 3 zeroes.

Let us march boldly into this new and unknown time expecting the best for this earth and all its inhabitants. But let us remember that, although the second millenium was marked by improvement in the human condition, progress was uneven with many backsteps and times when we almost lost it and that the first millenium was a time of cultural losses. So we must realize that nowhere is it written that progress is inevitable but instead depends on the collective wisdom and efforts of all.

On the farm this year we no longer grew corn or soybeans but put all our fields in grass for the cattle except for an acre and a half for the much smaller tobacco crop. We sowed 34 acres of grass for pasture this spring. Our tobacco base which had been as high as six thousand pounds in recent years was cut down to less than three thousand pounds. Our cow herd is now down to twenty breeding cows from the one hundred we once had. So we purchased about 150 calves in the spring and concentrated on growing them on pasture this summer to sell in the fall. We did not do as well as we had hoped on the calves due to high death losses just after purchase and to a late summer drought which forced us to sell one or two months earlier than we had planned. They did make some money though.

The logger working for us continued to cut cedar trees through the winter and in the spring we let him cut a few hardwood trees from farm fencerows. He went elsewhere to cut timber in the summer but returned in the fall to finish cutting the 50 to 100 hardwood trees we had marked for cutting. In the meantime the 16 acre pine plantation which my mother and father had planted in 1951 was infested with pine bark beetles and all the pines were killed. So I had the logger to salvage all those trees. He cut over 100,000 board feet of pine logs which we sold on a depressed pine market for about $7,000 for our part. If we could have let them stand for twenty more years, as I had planned, we could have harvested 150,000 to 200,000 board feet and gotten about $20,000 for our part at today's prices.

Our computer business did well. We sold computers and programs to a number of new customers including a new doctor in Burkesville and a natural gas company in Lexington. In addition to sales and consulting services for our previous customers, we continued making improvements to our PGAS accounting system which we had rewritten in 1999. We also began making our own music CDs this year and scanning our pictures and slides taken during the last 40 years into the computer.

My sister, Karen, continued working with the state department of Social Services in Somerset this year gaining a promotion. Karen worked hard in her back yard during the winter digging and stocking a gold fish pond bigger than the one we have. Labor day she visited with our aunt, Mae Beck, in Straughn, Indiana.

I served on the grand jury, meeting once a month, during the first six months of the year. In late March I visited Greg Webb, the District Forester with the Kentucky Division of Forestry, in Elizabethtown, Kentucky. I had worked with Greg in Pineville twenty five years ago and had not seen him since leaving there. In the late spring I spent a day at the Clinton County Middle School at career day telling the kids about work as a forester and a computer programmer.

I hiked for two miles on the farm three or four times a week during the year to help keep my diabetes under control.

Our neighbor, Christine Wade, died this year and in early July, Smitty's, a favorite restaurant in this area for 40 years went out of business. We had often served family visitors pork tenderloin sandwiches from Smitty's. Now that is no more.

I did continue cooking out during the year and our sons and David's family visited us once a month or so. Our granddaughter, Victoria, graduated kindergarten in late May and we went to Danville for her graduation. We took our three grandchildren to the local family cemeteries at Memorial day and they spent a number of weekends with us during the year.

Eva grew a good garden this year. She had a heart catherization at Lexington in April. They found no blockages. She also joined a group of experimental subjects for a new type of cancer screening at the University of Kentucky Medical Center. She gets a free cancer screening once a year. So we spent a couple of nights in Lexington this year for medical purposes and visited our son, Chris, while we were there. In late June we picked up Chris in Lexington and he went with us to visit aunt Mae Beck in Straughn, Indiana. She is 87 years old this year.

We had a number of visitors besides our sons and grandchildren and Eva's sisters this year. Labor day, in early September, Eva's aunt, Elsie, and her granddaughters drove down from near Chicago and we had a family dinner at a restaurant in town. In October Eva's brother, Norman, and his wife, Doris, visited us as did Eva's widowed sister-in-law, Jay Harlan. Also our friends from Turkey, Tuna and Mesude, visited us during the Foothills Festival in late October. They are living in Louisville now while Tuna studies hand surgery.

In February I helped our son, Chris, get a replacement for his car. He bought a 1995 Plymouth Neon. In July Chris was off from his job at Rent-A- Center for a while and worked at a job trying to collect medical accounts by phone. He didn't like that job though and didn't stay long.

The biggest news with both our sons, David and Chris, though was that in late August they left the bluegrass area of Kentucky and moved to the Albany, New York area. They had an unsuitable boss at Rent-A-Center in Kentucky but were given promotions to take similiar jobs at Rent-A-Center stores in New York. So in Mid July we kept our two granddaughters while David and Tisha took a vacation in New York and checked out the Albany area. They decided to move and Chris went to New York in late July and stayed over a week looking for a place or places for all of them to live. They finally rented a house big enough for David's family and with a room for Chris and took about a week to move around the end of August.

David and his family returned to Kentucky for a visit in early December and spent a few days with us, but Chris had no vacation time accrued so was unable to return. So, at Christmas, Eva and I flew to New York and spent a snowy Christmas with the kids. We had a very enjoyable trip. It was Eva's first plane flight and my first one in a commercial plane, although I had done a lot of flying in small planes smoke spotting with the Division of Forestry in the 1970s.

In November we were saddened to see the United States presidental election stolen by the United States Supreme Court.

We all hope that 2001 is a good year for all our friends and relatives.


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The Year 2001 for the Bristows

of Albany, Kentucky 42602

by Duane Bristow

On the farm this year we concentrated on pasturing 150 calves, purchased in the spring, again this year plus the 20 calves produced by our cow head. This was successful and we only lost one calf all year so we were able to sell 169 calves about Thanksgiving. We made a small amount of money on the cattle and would have made more if cattle prices hadn't fallen about 10% after September 11. Our tobacco allotment was increased to about 4,000 pounds and that crop did well. Other than that, farm work was mostly clipping pastures and combatting the thistles that attempt to dominate many of our pasture fields each year. We also harvested about 70 rolls of hay in one spring cutting. Charlie, the man who has lived on our farm and helped us for almost twenty years, left this fall and said that he probably wouldn't be back in the spring because of his deteriorating health. However, his son, Kenny will be available to help us keep the farm running next year.

We had a number of visitors this year including Eva's nephew, Gene Harlan, his wife, Sue, and family who visited us in March from Oklahoma City. Also Eva's brother, Norman, and his wife, Doris, visited with us in October and Eva's sisters, Mary and Ruth, and their husbands came by a few times during the year. Other visitors included Eva's sister-in-law, Jay, and her grandson, Josh, and his family and our Indian friend from Virginia, Thunder Sollock.

Our son, David, his wife, Tisha, and our grandchildren from upstate New York visited us for a few days in mid April. Then in July Tisha came back to Kentucky with the kids to stay for most of the month spending time with us and with her family in Danville. While here she took the kids fishing at Kenny Denny's pay lake, started on a neighboring farm this year, and the girls had a big time catching many small fish.

Our son, Chris, finally got to take a vacation from work in early December and flew in from New York to spend a week with us. We enjoyed his visit too. He seemed happy to be able to return to Kentucky.

David and Chris and David's family continued living and working in the area around Albany, New York this year. David spent a few days in Las Vegas at the end of February at a work related meeting and had a good time. Chris spent the Memorial Day weekend vacationing in the Baltimore, Washington area and filled Eva and I in on his adventures there by phone.

Eva and I took a number of trips during the year including visiting my Aunt Lorene and some cousins in Tennessee in February and an overnite stay in Lexington along with a couple of doctors visits in June. Also in June we stayed overnight with Eva's sister, Ruth, and her husband, Nathan, while I worked on a computer project in Somerset. In late June we spent a couple of days with my Aunt Mae in Straughn, Indiana.

In early August we flew to Albany, New York and spent a few days with Chris and David and his family. On that trip Eva and I took an overnight trip to the Boston vicinity and stayed at a Bed and Breakfast in Salem, MA as well as visiting Louisa Mae Alcott's house and Walden Pond in Concord. On the return trip from Boston to Albany we visited Cape Ann and drove through the Berkshires. The next day David and Chris and the kids and Eva and I spent on a champagne breakfast boat cruise on Lake George in New York. We had a good visit and flew back to Kentucky.

We returned to the kids' place in Albany for Christmas and spent a fun Christmas with them.

My sister Karen continued working for the state this year. She took a couple of trips to visit friends of hers in Cincinnati in January and over Labor Day. In early October she went on a two week bus tour of New England which she enjoyed.

Eva's knee gave her more trouble in January and February and she had to make a number of trips to the local hospital for therapy and she got a couple of cortisone shots during the year. In late August she fell in a parking lot and cracked a bone in her elbow which took several weeks to heal.

I continued walking two miles every couple of days to help with my diabetes and high blood pressure. I was able to keep both under control with exercise and medication.

As for work, I continued with lots of computer consulting and setting up new business systems this year as well as spending several months completely rewriting and updating my Pharmacy software. I also bought office furniture and rearranged the front guest bedroom into a combination bedroom and office, giving me more room to work. I also bought two window air conditioners for the upstairs so that, for the first time, Eva and I have an air conditioned bedroom. For us, that is a luxury.

I did more timber cruising than usual this year cruising about 1850 acres on seven cruising jobs ranging in size from 50 acres to 800 acres. I also got a handheld GPS unit which was very useful on timber cruising jobs.

I began transferring our collection of personal photos and slides and home videos and LP records and tapes into the computer but it is a time consuming job because of the amount of material accumulated in a lifetime.

I had started out the door on September 11 to begin a timber cruising job when I saw video of the first plane hitting the World Trade Center on a morning news program. Work was forgotten that day and we and the nation watched unfolding news events. For the next several nights the skies over our farm were quieter than they had been since I was a small boy. It seemed strange, day and night, to never see or hear a plane in the sky.

This fall my great uncle by marriage, Bill Adler, died in Richmond, Indiana. I think he was around 92 years old.

We all hope that 2002 is a good year for all our friends and relatives.


The Year 2002 for the Bristows

of Albany, Kentucky 42602

by Duane Bristow

On the farm this year we concentrated on pasturing 150 calves, purchased in the spring, again this year plus the 20 calves produced by our cow head. Most of the new calves came in March and we were busy then with calving, feeding hay and receiving new calves purchased. This was successful and we only lost one calf all year so we were able to sell 161 calves after Thanksgiving. We made a small amount of money on the cattle but cattle prices were a little lower in the fall than we had expected. Also a late summer drought dried up the pastures and caused us to have to feed the calves some hay starting in late September. That met using more hay than we had planned and we did not get the weight gains on the calves from grass that we had hoped for in October and November. We kept eight calves to sell in the spring. Our tobacco allotment was again about 4,000 pounds and that crop did well. Other than that, farm work was mostly clipping pastures and combatting the thistles that attempt to dominate many of our pasture fields each year. We also harvested about 180 rolls of hay in spring and fall. Donnie Stinson harvested the hay on the halves. Kenny Myers helped us with the farm work again this year.

Two spring storms in mid May knocked down trees in both ours and Karen's yard and knocked out the electricity to our water pump so that it took most of the rest of the month to get the yards cleaned up and repairs done.

We had a number of visitors this year including Eva's sisters, Mary and Ruth, and their husbands who came by a few times during the year. Other visitors included Eva's sister-in-law, Jay, and her granddaughter, Ronda.

Our son, David, his wife, Tisha, and our grandchildren from upstate New York were involved in several things this year. In January Victoria had her tonsils removed. David and Tisha and the girls vacationed in Boston for a couple of days in March. Then in April they visited us for a few days. Tisha went with a girlfriend to New York City for a weekend in June and they went to a Broadway play. David and Tisha decided that they liked Kentucky better than New York, so in August Tisha and the kids returned to Kentucky. They stayed with Tisha's mother, Pat, in Danville until Tisha found a house to buy in Perryville. She got the kids started in school. The girls went to a private religious school and Cruz started his last year in High School in Boyle County so that he could graduate in the spring of 2003. The first of October Tisha flew back to New York while Eva and I kept the girls. Then she and David moved their stuff to Kentucky to their house in Perryville. David transferred his job to the Rent-A-Center in Danville. After moving back Victoria started karate lessons. David and his family spent Thanksgiving with us and we all celebrated Christmas together on December 31.

At Christmas Eva and I flew to Albany, New York to spend the holiday with our son Chris. We were there on Christmas day when a 24 inch snow fell with up to 36 inches in the mountains. It was the most snow I had ever shoveled. We were able to fly home the day after Christmas though. Actually that was our second trip to Albany during the year. We flew there for four days in August when David and his family were still there to visit with them and Chris. We all took a car trip to Poughkeepsie and toured Hyde Park, home of Franklin D. Roosevelt. We also toured Martin Van Buren's home while we were in New York then.

Our son, Chris, had left his job with Rent-A-Center in January and went to work for a convenience store chain named Stewarts in March. He left that job and went back to Rent-A-Center in late August. He had been living with David and Tisha but when they moved back to Kentucky he moved into his own apartment in early October. Chris enjoyed short trips to Toronto and Cooperstown and to ball games in New York City and Boston during the year as well as attending concerts in the Albany area.

Eva and I took a number of trips during the year including visiting my Aunt Mae in Indiana in January and a couple of trips to Lexington as well as an overnite stay at a Bed and Breakfast in Smith's Grove, Kentucky in October. I had a two day Medicare programming meeting in Indianapolis in April, so Eva went with me and we stayed at a nice hotel there. We also flew to New York twice.

Eva continued to put up with pain in her knees and back. She had quite a bit of sinus trouble around Christmas. She got a new Maytag washing machine in October. The last one had lasted her 23 years. We enjoyed working in the garden and in the yard and watching the foxes, deer, squirrels, rabbits, birds and raccoons eating in our yard and in the case of birds and raccoons on our porch. The foxes and raccoons had babies with them in the summer. The three baby raccoons and their mother ate all the grapes on our porch railing one night just before they got fully ripe. We grilled out often during the year and several times Eva and I took car trips into the fields on the farm to look at the cattle and the fields and the mountains and have picnics.

My sister Karen continued working for the state this year. She took a couple of trips to visit Aunt Mae in Indiana Memorial Day and Labor Day.

I continued walking two miles every couple of days to help with my diabetes and high blood pressure. I was able to keep both under control with exercise and medication. I enjoy seeing the farm and the mountains on my walks as well as checking the cattle and seeing deer and wild turkeys. I and a guy I hired cut quite a bit of firewood in the winter as well as making firewood from the treetops downed in the storm so we have a good supply for the next couple of winters.

As for work, I continued with lots of computer consulting and setting up new business systems this year as well as spending several months completely rewriting and updating my medical practice software to conform to new federal regulations for electronic medical billing.

I did three timber cruising jobs in the spring and fall this year in Wayne and McCreary Counties. Kenny Myers and his nephew helped me.

I worked on transferring our collection of personal photos and slides and home videos and LP records and tapes into the computer but did not have time to finish the job.

We all hope that 2003 is a good year for all our friends and relatives.


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